Christensen’s Disruptive Innovation after the Lepore Critique

@cnewf aka Christopher Newfield (of Remaking the University) adds socio-cultural on how different higher ed players see “disruption” and “innovation”

ACADEME BLOG

The following piece by Christopher Newfield, Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, first appeared on the blog, “Remaking the University,” which he runs with UCLA Professor Michael Meranze.  It is reposted by permission. 

Must innovation disrupt everything so that society might have new and better things? Widespread fatigue with this idea inspired a number of headlines last week.  “The Emperor of “Disruption Theory” is Wearing No Clothes,” exclaimed one response.  Paul Krugman described a “careful takedown,” suggesting that the whole era of innovation might collapse from its own overhype (“Creative Destruction Yada Yada.”)  Jonathan Rees referenced an “absolutely devastating takedown.”  All three were talking about Jill Lepore’s much-discussed New Yorker critique of prominent business consultant Clayton Christensen’s theory of “disruptive innovation.” Prof. Rees concluded, “Like MacArthur at Inchon, [Prof. Lepore] has landed behind enemy lines and will hopefully force…

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About @NatM4Equity

The National Mobilization for Equity is a coalition of organizations committed to alleviating the present staffing crisis in higher education: three-quarters of the teaching jobs in American colleges are held by underpaid, precarious and poorly-supported contingent faculty. Our long-term goal is to end contingency as the norm. The current untenable situation not only adversely affects all faculty members, both contingent and tenure-track, it also negatively impacts our profession, our students and the quality of their education.

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