Today’s News & Commentary — March 10, 2015

ON LABOR

The Supreme Court has released its opinion in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Associationa significant administrative law case impacting the Labor Department and NLRB’s rule-making authority. In a 9-0 decision, the Court held that an executive agency can change its interpretation of its own rules/regulations without going through a notice-and-comment period. This decision overturns the previous standard (the Paralyzed Veterans doctrine), which did require federal agencies to go through public notice-and-comment procedures if they substantially altered an “interpretive” rule. Read more background and commentary at SCOTUSBlog.

Today, oral arguments were heard in a case challenging part of Seattle’s new $15 minimum wage laws. The International Franchise Association, represented by Paul Clement, argues that the law violates franchisor’s First Amendment rights, discriminating against franchisees as it designates their stores as “big businesses” ineligible for delayed enactment. The case is International Franchise Association Inc., et al. v City of Seattle, et al.,  and the complaint can be…

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About @NatM4Equity

The National Mobilization for Equity is a coalition of organizations committed to alleviating the present staffing crisis in higher education: three-quarters of the teaching jobs in American colleges are held by underpaid, precarious and poorly-supported contingent faculty. Our long-term goal is to end contingency as the norm. The current untenable situation not only adversely affects all faculty members, both contingent and tenure-track, it also negatively impacts our profession, our students and the quality of their education.

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